The flowers I gathered were all found in my backyard. I have a ravine with some hardwoods. I collected all of the flowers at the top of the ravine. So they were found in open fields or along the forest edge in a drier areas since they were located at the top of the slope. I personally am not nearly as familiar with flower identification as I am with woody plants, so I am definitely more “flower blind” in this aspect. Definitely learned a lot this week with regard to flower identification. Can still definitely work on the skill, but I got a good start.

Pokeweed

(Phytolaccaceae – Phytolacca decandra)

It is on page 200 in Newcomb’s Wildflowers

Common name: Pokeweed  Scientific name: Phytolacca  decandra

Corolla:  number of petals  separate or  fused? Fused

Calyx:    number of sepals  None  separate or fused?   N/A

Adroecium: number of stamens  10 separate, fused or arranged in any special way?

Gynoecium type: syncarpous (and # of carpels = 10)
How can you tell?  10 carpels in 1 pistil.

Flower type/ovary position: Hypogynous, or  perigynous or epigynous?

Flower symmetry: actinomorphic (regular) or zygomorphic (irregular)?

Additional distinctive features: Bright pink stem, berries dark purple when ripe and resemble small tomatoes when unripe.

Bastard Toadflax

(Camandra umbellata – Santalaceae)

It is on page 202 in Newcomb’s Wildflowers

Common name: Bastard toadflax Scientific name: Camandra umbellata

Corolla:  number of petals  separate or  fused? Seperate

Calyx:    number of sepals  separate or fused?   Seperate

Adroecium: number of stamens  5  separate, fused or arranged in any special way?

Gynoecium type: unicarpellate, apocarpous, or  syncarpous (and # of carpels = 1)
How can you tell?  1 carpel in 1 pistil.

Flower type/ovary position: Hypogynous, or  perigynous or epigynous?

Flower symmetry: actinomorphic (regular) or zygomorphic (irregular)?

Additional distinctive features:

 

Creeping wood sorrel

(Oxalis corniculata – Oxalidaceae)

It is on page 246 in Newcomb’s Wildflowers

Common name: Creeping wood sorrel Scientific name: Oxalis corniculata

Corolla:  number of petals  separate or  fused? Fused

Calyx:    number of sepals  separate or fused?   Fused

Adroecium: number of stamens  5+ separate, fused or arranged in any special way? – I had a hard time counting all the stamens, but there were at least 5.

Gynoecium type: unicarpellate, apocarpous, or  syncarpous (and # of carpels = 1)
How can you tell?  1 carpel in 1 pistil.

Flower type/ovary position: Hypogynous, or  perigynous or epigynous?

Flower symmetry: actinomorphic (regular) or zygomorphic (irregular)?

Additional distinctive features: This was found growing closely along the ground. None of the growths were very tall, but there were some pretty big bundles of it. When I pulled up some of it I actually got most of the roots along with it because the root systems were not very deep or extensive. It has clover-like leaves.

 

Queen Anne’s lace

(Daucus carota – Apiaceae)

It is on page 220 in Newcomb’s Wildflowers

Common name: Queen Anne’s lace Scientific name: Daucus carota

Corolla:  number of petals  separate or  fused? Seperate

Calyx:    number of sepals  separate or fused?   Seperate

Adroecium: number of stamens  5  separate, fused or arranged in any special way? 

Gynoecium type: unicarpellate, apocarpous, or  syncarpous (and # of carpels = 1)
How can you tell?  1 carpel in 1 pistil.

Flower type/ovary position: Hypogynous, or  perigynous or epigynous?

Flower symmetry: actinomorphic (regular) or zygomorphic (irregular)?

Additional distinctive features: I used smell. There are a lot of look alikes and I couldn’t find the middle black bud, but the roots smelled distinctly like carrots. Shaped in an umbel.

Marigold

(Tagetes – Asteraceae)

It is on page 204 in Newcomb’s Wildflowers

Common name: Marigold Scientific name: Tagetes

Corolla:  number of petals  >9  separate or  fused? Fused

Calyx:    number of sepals  separate or fused?   Fused

Adroecium: number of stamens  5  separate, fused or arranged in any special way? Fused around the style.

Gynoecium type: unicarpellate, apocarpous, or  syncarpous (and # of carpels = 2)
How can you tell?  2 carpels in 1 pistil.

Flower type/ovary position: Hypogynous, or  perigynous or epigynous?

Flower symmetry: actinomorphic (regular) or zygomorphic (irregular)?

Additional distinctive features: This was found in a garden so it is cultivated and doesn’t have all of the characteristics a wild marigold would have.  Because of this I was also unable to find the specific species of marigold this was.

Common mallow

(Malva neglecta – Malvaceae)

It is on page 206 in Newcomb’s Wildflowers

Common name: Common mallow Scientific name: Malva neglecta

Corolla:  number of petals  separate or  fused? Fused

Calyx:    number of sepals  separate or fused?   Fused

Adroecium: number of stamens  5  separate, fused or arranged in any special way?

Gynoecium type: unicarpellate, apocarpous, or  syncarpous (and # of carpels = 9)
How can you tell?  9 carpel in 1 pistil – the flower was very small so it was hard to tell exactly how many carpels there were.

Flower type/ovary position: Hypogynous, or  perigynous or epigynous?

Flower symmetry: actinomorphic (regular) or zygomorphic (irregular)?

Additional distinctive features: Found crawling along the ground. The leaves had many ruffles and looked like small woodland lily pads to me.  They had an overall roundish shape to them.

Early goldenrod

(Solidago juncea – Asteraceae)

It is on page 446 in Newcomb’s Wildflowers

Common name: Early goldenrod Scientific name: Solidago juncea

Corolla:  number of petals  separate or  fused? Fused

Calyx:    number of sepals  separate or fused?   Fused

Adroecium: number of stamens  5  separate, fused or arranged in any special way?

Gynoecium type: unicarpellate, apocarpous, or  syncarpous (and # of carpels = 2)
How can you tell?  2 carpel sin 1 pistil – again, very small flowers and hard to count how many carpels were in each pistil.

Flower type/ovary position: Hypogynous, or  perigynous or epigynous?

Flower symmetry: actinomorphic (regular) or zygomorphic (irregular)?

Additional distinctive features: Was composed of spikes.  I was not sure about the specific species within goldenrod.  The basal leaves were withered and dead most likely due to the drought, but the leaves I was able to find lower on the stem had some toothing. Between the leaves and that I found it along the forest edge, I believe it to be an Early goldenrod.

 Spotted Touch-me-not

(Impatiens capensis – Balsaminaceae)

It is on page 54 in Newcomb’s Wildflowers

Common name: Spotted touch-me-not Scientific name: Impatiens capensis

Corolla:  number of petals  5 separate or  fused? Fused

Calyx:    number of sepals  separate or fused?   Fused

Adroecium: number of stamens  4  separate, fused or arranged in any special way? – fused along lower petals

Gynoecium type: unicarpellate, apocarpous, or  syncarpous (and # of carpels = 1)
How can you tell?  1 carpel in 1 pistil – it was hard to find the carpels due to the unique shape.

Flower type/ovary position: Hypogynous, or  perigynous or epigynous?

Flower symmetry: actinomorphic (regular) or zygomorphic (irregular)?

Additional distinctive features: Very distinct cone/funnel shape. Orange color is common with the spotted variety along with the spots located on the petals.